Apr 15, 2021
Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II
Posted by Jörg Muth

Selected by General Raymond Odierno, 38th Army Chief of Staff, for the U.S Army Chief of Staff s Professional Reading List, for The Army Profession, March 2012 Selected by General James F Amos, Commandant of the U.S Marine Corps, as required reading for all senior enlisted men and all Majors and Lieutenant Colonels, January 2013.Selected by Major General H.R McMasteSelected by General Raymond Odierno, 38th Army Chief of Staff, for the U.S Army Chief of Staff s Professional Reading List, for The Army Profession, March 2012 Selected by General James F Amos, Commandant of the U.S Marine Corps, as required reading for all senior enlisted men and all Majors and Lieutenant Colonels, January 2013.Selected by Major General H.R McMaster at the Maneuver Center of Excellence, Fort Benning, for the Leader Development Study Program, December 2013 Winner of the Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award, 2012 In Command Culture, J rg Muth examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next But in the United States, there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment American officers who finally made their way through an erratic selection process and past West Point to the important Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, found themselves usually deeply disappointed, because they were faced again with a rather below average faculty who forced

  • Title: Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II
  • Author: Jörg Muth
  • ISBN: 9781574413038
  • Page: 222
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Command Culture Officer Education in the U S Army and the German Armed Forces and the Consequences for World War II Selected by General Raymond Odierno th Army Chief of Staff for the U S Army Chief of Staff s Professional Reading List for The Army Profession March Selected by General James F Amos Comman

    Jared

    Command Culture is a fascinating book that I ran across one day while perusing the titles at Barnes Noble The subject is one I found to be quite novel The author compares the US and German militaries during the first half of the 20th century The scope of the book is largely the officer selection process, service academies, and approaches towards leadership As mentioned, the time frame is during the 20th century, but the author slips back in time even further in order to provide additional contex [...]


    Martin Samuels

    In this fascinating book, Muth presents a relentless attack on the US Army s system of officer education, constantly contrasting it negatively with the equivalent approaches in the German Army.In essence, Muth argues that the system at both West Point and similar officer cadet institutions such as VMI and Fort Leavenworth was based on the twin beliefs that the best education for officers was through a mathematical engineering paradigm, coupled with rigid peer discipline and total submission to h [...]


    Joe

    A great book that gives leaders a better understanding of the origins of Mission Command It also provides insight into what a command climate should look like within our units.


    Lee

    This is an interesting comparison of officer selection and training in the United States and Germany in the interim years between the World Wars.The author is harshly critical of the American system of officer education, in which military academies produced conformist, cautious leaders with little knowledge of tactics and even less understanding of actual soldiers At West Point, cadets were taught to memorize the numbers of windows in their buildings but not how to maneuver a platoon or call for [...]


    Joseph Stieb

    In Command Culture, Jorg Muth, a German scholar of the American military, compares the officer education systems of the U.S Army and the German Armed forces from 1901 to 1940 and explains the consequences of those systems for officer performance in battle in World War II Command culture is Muth s useful term for how an officer corps collectively understands its roles and options on the battlefield, solves tactical and strategic problems, and interacts with people above or below in the chain of c [...]


    THOMAS M VIOTTI

    Army leadership training This book was very clear on the attention that needs to be focused on during the initial education of officers at any academy.


    Andrew

    So far, a fascinating read that examines the American and German officer education systems from 1901 1940 Muth compares approaches towards officer education in both countries from pre commissioning through the Command and General Staff Kriegsakademie school through senior military schooling such as the War College Muth highlights the general reluctance of American officers to go to school in the first place In many cases, such as Creighton Abrams, he did not go to a single school from when he wa [...]


    Fred Leland

    I thought this was a fantastic book not only the historical analysis of United States and German Armies during WWII and what made them execute in combat but how the training, eduction and selection of officers effected their performance The books explains the importance of things like mutual trust and auftragstaktik mission oriented command system that led to an understanding and acceptance of the need for decision thresholds to be fixed as far down the hierarchy as possible, and for freedom of [...]


    Mark Eickhoff

    Dr Muth completely flips over the apple cart in this thought provoking comparison and contrast of the officer education systems of the U.S and German armies prior to WWII He demonstrates that American officer education as exemplified by West Point and the Command and General Staff School was based on rank, conformity, rigid adherence to doctrine, and school solution approaches to military problems This contrasted with the Prussian German system that was based far on individual merit, initiative [...]


    George

    Comparative analyses are frequently useful as in this book that examines both the US and German officer education processes and institutions between 1901 1940 It provides a useful history as precursor to contemporary analyses of professional military education History may not repeat itself, but it certainly echoes, and it is not hard to see that some of the issues in military education that were problematic in the early 1900s remain suggesting they are deeply rooted in military culture I recomme [...]


    Tom

    Overall an excellent book Where Dr Muth is lacking is an equal glimpse into today s Bundeswehr as he did for the U.S Army s opening maneuvers in Iraq in the last chapter.


    Zhifei Ge

    A book good comparing military cadet education between USA and Germany It touches the cultural aspects with in depth thoughts The only thing lacking is quantitative comparisons.


    Rob Humphrey

    A very interesting comparison of the U.S And German officer education systems.



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    Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901-1940, and the Consequences for World War II