Apr 15, 2021
The Battle for Rome: The Germans, the Allies, the Partisans, and the Pope, September 1943--June 1944
Posted by Robert Katz

In September 1943, the German army marched into Rome, beginning an occupation that would last nine months until Allied forces liberated the ancient city During those 270 days, clashing factions the occupying Germans, the Allies, the growing resistance movement, and the Pope contended for control over the destiny of the Eternal City In The Battle for Rome, Robert KaIn September 1943, the German army marched into Rome, beginning an occupation that would last nine months until Allied forces liberated the ancient city During those 270 days, clashing factions the occupying Germans, the Allies, the growing resistance movement, and the Pope contended for control over the destiny of the Eternal City In The Battle for Rome, Robert Katz vividly recreates the drama of the occupation and offers new information from recently declassified documents to explain the intentions of the rival forces One of the enduring myths of World War II is the legend that Rome was an open city, free from military activity In fact the German occupation was brutal, beginning almost immediately with the first roundup of Jews in Italy Rome was a strategic prize that the Germans and the Allies fought bitterly to win The Allied advance up the Italian peninsula from Salerno and Anzio in some of the bloodiest fighting of the war was designed to capture the Italian capital Dominating the city in his own way was Pope Pius XII, who used his authority in a ceaseless effort to spare Rome, especially the Vatican and the papal properties, from destruction But historical documents demonstrate that the Pope was as concerned about the Partisans as he was about the Nazis, regarding the Partisans as harbingers of Communism in the Eternal City The Roman Resistance was a coalition of political parties that agreed on little

  • Title: The Battle for Rome: The Germans, the Allies, the Partisans, and the Pope, September 1943--June 1944
  • Author: Robert Katz
  • ISBN: 9780743258081
  • Page: 404
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Battle for Rome The Germans the Allies the Partisans and the Pope September June In September the German army marched into Rome beginning an occupation that would last nine months until Allied forces liberated the ancient city During those days clashing factions the oc

    A.L. Sowards

    Really enjoyed this book It s a great example of readable history, covering the time from Italy s armistice with the British and Americans until the liberation of Rome It focuses on the diplomats, spies, and partisans, but also gives enough information about the military situation to help readers see the big picture readers looking for a campaign focused account will probably be better served by picking up a different book I felt the book s strength was in its coverage of the partisans, the rou [...]


    Charlie

    Details thrived in this book THE BATTLE FOR ROME At first I thought too much info was taking away from the book by Robert Katz However, as I really got into the battle for Rome I found it facinating in this period of the war.


    Steve

    An in depth account of the German occupation of Rome in the late stages of WWII, after the fall of Mussolini and Italy s subsequent surrender and technical switch to the Allied side The early parts of the book are a bit challenging if like me you didn t know many specifics of the German occupation and partisan resistance the details of the many partisan groups opposed to the Fascists and Germans alone are enough to get a reader bogged down but the author does generally keep the story moving forw [...]


    Kenneth Barber

    This book details the occupation of Rome by the Germans from July , 1943 until June 5,1945 It traces the development of the partisan factions that fought the Nazis This group was divided into many factions depending on political persuasion i.e Communist, democratic or monarchist They often tried to work in concert but often their political divisions kept them apart In addition, there were agents of the OSS, the forerunner of the CIA, working int the city The activities of sabotage and the Nazi r [...]


    Buck

    There aren t many good books on the German occupation of Rome This is a very good entry It s not easy to be impartial when it comes to WWII, the Pope and the Occupation, so it was no surprise that there were some sections where the author slipped into editorial mode This doesn t ruin the account, though The story is mostly told through the eyes of the Partisans made personal through them I liked this approach There isn t a lot of big picture here but the audience is probably already somewhat fam [...]


    Barksdale Penick

    I read this book as we headed over to Rome It presents a comprehensive overview of World War II in Rome Excellent descriptions of the Germans, the Partisans, the Vatican, and various spies I found particularly interesting that the ruthless German commander in Rome, who organized and carried out the Ardeatina massacre as a response to a Partisan attack, also strove to prevent the roundup and deportation of Roman Jews to concentration camps The weakest art of the book, in my view, is the actual de [...]


    Nathan

    The Battle for Rome The Germans, the Allies, the Partisans, and the Pope, September 1943 June 1944 is as specific and as simple as its title Robert Katz has painted a fascinating portrait of a city that was supposed to be above it all, yet wound up knee deep in it There s everything you d expect from great WWII era history spies, partisans, resistance fighters, occupying armies, plots Oh, yeah And a Pope


    Stormy

    I found this book in a reviewers sale at the Gazette when I worked there and found the history fascinating When I was fortunate enough to visit Rome two years ago, we were staying just one block from where the resistance fighters were based and eventually killed Rome is so very FULL of history an endlessly fascinating place for me.


    Alan

    The story is largely told through first hand sources diaries, interview transcripts, etc but it still manages to be very engaging and suspenseful The Italian campaign isn t something I knew much about before reading this book.


    Lu

    partisans in rome


    Rod Zemke

    A good account of the battle for Rome You read this kind of book because you want details and that is what Katz delivers.


    Denise Kearney

    Recommended by Rick


    Rod Zemke

    A great piece of history from Katz Learned that for most of the war, Rome was an open city.



    • ☆ The Battle for Rome: The Germans, the Allies, the Partisans, and the Pope, September 1943--June 1944 ↠ Robert Katz
      404 Robert Katz
    The Battle for Rome: The Germans, the Allies, the Partisans, and the Pope, September 1943--June 1944